Safe-Guard 57g Fenbendazole Powerdose 5-Dose

$61.99
Regularly: $68.99
Today's savings: 10%
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Safe-Guard 57g Fenbendazole Powerdose 5-Dose

$61.99

In Stock. Usually Ships within 24 hours.
Shipping weight = 1.45 lbs.

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Product Summary:

PowerDose Pack includes: (5) 57gm Tubes

Safe-Guard® (fenbendazole) Paste 10% contains the active anthelmintic, fenbendazole. Each gram of Safe-Guard Paste 10% contains 100 mg of fenbendazole and is flavored with artificial apple-cinnamon liquid.

Size: 5 double dose tubes per pack - each tube containing 57 gram paste 10% (100 mg/g). Tube size is 4" and the nozzle is 1½".
 
This item is not available in Canada.
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Product Reviews by Customers

Browse 4 questions and 27 answers
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Why did you choose this?
Horse.com Store
to treat (2) two yr. old colts that had never been treated before and to start them on proper deworming program.
BRADY P on Mar 17, 2015
I have a friend that recommended this.
Ann H on Dec 30, 2014
Best price on line for this great product.
Renee Z on Mar 9, 2015
it was a product I wanted
CINDY D on Dec 30, 2014
Is this product safe for mares that are in foal?
A shopper on Mar 1, 2014
Best Answer: I don't know what the label says on the back, but I, personally, would not use a powerpack on a pregnant mare. The reason being, when they are heavy in foal, there is not a lot of room in there for the foal and the intestines etc. If she has a bad reaction to the level of product or the level of die-off, she could become very uncomfortable and colic. I had that once after deworming (not a powerpack) and that's how the vet explained it to me. With decreased space for intestines, you don't want to exacerbate any issues until the foal is born. Stick with one dose or a less potent drug, such as Ivermectin or Pyrental Pamoate. You can always powerpack after she foals. Good luck!!
Reply · Report · KATE S on Mar 2, 2014
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I live in So. Cal. and I wormed in the Fall with Ivectrin Gold; we had a very mild winter with hardly any rain and hot temps already in the Spring. What wormer should I use? I used to use your rotationals but now it is being said to not overworm. The horses are starting to rub their tails. I have a Holsteiner mare and 2 1/2 yr old Clydesdale/Hackney Horse. Thank you very much!
janet p on May 5, 2015
Best Answer: I administer a Thoroughbred farm in Florida and we do a rotational program between strongid(pyrantel), ivermectin, and the safeguard(panacur) with a 1x dose generally in August/Sept here of Equimax to the mares. I have foals, yearlings, and mares here on the farm and we follow the protocol set out by our vet. I haven't heard of the type of horses you have so I can't really say. If they are rubbing their tails and you are concerned I think that if you collected a stool sample that your vet should be able to run some test to determine the fecal makeup which would tell you if you need to worm. The cost to me is minimal per tube so we just do it rather than listen to this study says this now. Coffee used to be bad for humans and now its supposed to be good. You have to decide whats best for your animals.
Reply · Report · CHRIS G on May 5, 2015
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how come you don't have the rotational kits anymore? I think they were 24.99
A shopper on Aug 9, 2014
Best Answer: Studies have shown that too frequent worming of horses is creating resistance quickly. Working should be based on horse management techniques and fecal tests. Given this, rotational working is a waste of money.
Reply · Report · SUSAN L on Aug 9, 2014
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